Seizing Opportunities

Another school year has begun or it will begin soon. This is my 13th year as an instructional technology specialist/coach. I am sitting here reflecting on the teachers, students, administrators, parents, and other staff members I have had the honor of serving. It’s such fun meeting people here in my new school district and also when I get the opportunity to travel and speak in other places around the country. What many don’t realize is that while they might be coming to learn from me in a formal setting, I am enjoying learning from them just as much. I learn new ideas for how teachers want to have their students learn with technology, I learn new ways of providing students more opportunity to learn outside of a traditional classroom space, how to redesign classroom spaces, how technology can level the playing field for learning opportunities regardless of race, gender, or socioeconomic status, and new ways to provide meaningful learning opportunities for educators and other staff. The list can go on but I think you get the idea.

rocket launch
https://www.flickr.com/people/gsfc/

The really cool thing is, I’m getting to help people and learn at the same time. Helping them is my passion; to help educators grow in their use of technology by providing meaningful learning experiences for them and the students we serve.

These are all opportunities worth seizing. I want to take as many as I can within reason whether they’re local, national or international. Sure, there are limitations on how much I can be gone from my full-time job and family, but that doesn’t lessen my desire of wanting more opportunities to grow. Sometimes I want opportunities I can’t have for one reason or another. Maybe the timing isn’t right or I’m just not the right person in a particular instance.  I can always respect that but it still bums me out from time to time. When that happens it’s a missed opportunity to help others grow and an opportunity for me to grow as well.

As you start a new school year, what opportunities are you going to seize? Sometimes they’re right under our noses, and sometimes we have to see bigger and shoot for the moon. Either way, don’t stop seizing opportunities to bring growth to yourself, your colleagues, and your students.

Have an outstanding school year.

Keeping Our Eyes on The #EdTech Horizon

We’re quickly approaching that time. The end of summer draws closer and the excitement of another school year begins. Many teachers enjoyed some relaxation as certainly did our students. Many of those same teachers also invested a lot of time and energy to learning about new ideas and technologies; whether that be attending a conference, edcamp, adding new books to their professional libraries or taking a grad class. The opportunities are, and will continue to be, plentiful.horizon

From my own experience, as well as something that can be quickly deduced by chatting with any educator interested in edtech, keeping up with it all is a never-ending challenge. We always have new tools, new devices, this movement, and that movement. To try to keep up with it all can feel like quite a daunting, yet incredibly satisfying task all at the same time.

Just like Uncle Ben told his nephew Peter, “With great power comes great responsibility.”. We now have the power to keep ourselves at the forefront of educational technology. We can connect and learn on Twitter, through reading blogs, attending face to face events, taking classes, or by just doing a quick search on YouTube. Even if we don’t have every device available or are using every tool that’s available, it’s important for teachers, as well as school/district leaders, to keep our eyes on the horizon for what’s possible. The horizon always looks far away, but it should represent a place where we want to go professionally and be a place we want to take our students to in their learning.

Excellence is the gradual result of always striving to do better. Pat Riley

 

I See Brilliant People – #ISTE2016 #iplza16

During the last two weeks, I had the privilege of traveling to Austin, Texas for iPadpalooza and then to Denver, Colorado for ISTE. I’ve been trying to put together a post that gives due justice to both learning experiences and more importantly the people I had the honor of being with. I think I’ve been over thinking it though. 🙂

First, let me give props to Carl Hooker. Carl invited me to be a featured speaker at iPadpalooza and it was already a conference I had been wanting to get to for some time. Everything about the conference was top-notch. Carl and his team thought of everything. It was well-organized, had both formal and informal learning experiences that were great , and they made sure there was something for everyone. I highly encourage anyone that has never been to make plans to head to Austin in 2017.

I went straight from Austin to Denver because I was attending (and presenting at) ISTE. I hardly ever go to conferences back to back like that so I made sure to build in a day in between the two conferences that was strictly for downtime (and to do laundry – Texas is hot y’all). ISTE is a behemoth of a conference; that’s no secret. If you go to ISTE as part of a team from your school or district, it’s really easy to do the “divide and conquer” thing to get a wide variety of learning experiences whether that be the poster sessions (which were awesome this year), the BYOD workshops, the concurrent sessions, and even in the exhibit hall. ISTE is a conference that everyone interested in edtech should experience at least once. If your school or district has the funds to take an entire team that’s even better.

After these conferences were over, the one predominant thought I had from all of it was, “Wow, I know some really brilliant people.”. Seriously, I brilliant peoplekeep thinking this over and over and how fortunate I am to have these people not only as professional colleagues, but I get to call many of them friends too. Such a great byproduct of networking with people online, then face to face or vice versa.

To sum it all up, I just want to express my sincere thanks. Thank you for making me a part of your network. Thank you to Carl Hooker, Don Goble, Monica Burns, April Requard, Cathy Hunt, Amy Burvall, Felix and Judy Jacomino, Wes and Shelly Fryer, Austin Kleon, Kerry Gallagher, Clara Galan, Derek McCoy, Audrey Harrison, Beth Still, Adam Bellow, all my peeps at EdTechTeam, and many many others. I appreciate the kind words and congrats about my career move. I hope I can do as good of a job of sharing that so many of you do weekly and sometimes daily. I admire all of you! I appreciate your brilliance and allowing me to learn from it.