Tag Archives: gsuiteedu

Get Your Google “To Go” with Google Takeout

Another school year has ended (for some) or is getting close to ending. At the end of every school year, there is always a finality for certain students and staff. Seniors are graduating, teachers are retiring or changing to another district, or just leaving the profession for various reasons. Either way, if you’re district uses G Suite for Education, people are going to have files in Google Drive, emails in Gmail, blogs using Blogger, etc. that they want to make sure and take with them. Nobody wants to lose important stuff!

Google Takeout is a handy way to save any or all parts of your Google account to take to a new school Google account or move to a personal Google account. For this post, I’m going to walk through the steps with Google Drive as the example.

When you arrive at the Google Takeout homepage, you will see listed all of the Google products you can download your data from. In the screenshot below, I’ve only selected Google Drive.

screenshot of Google Takeout home page

If you click the small options arrow next to the green check mark, you’ll get some more options specific to downloading your Google Drive files such as whether you want your entire Google Drive or just a particular folder in your Google Drive and some options for how you want each file type to be converted. The next screen grab shows this with the default options:

In certain situations, I have suggested to teachers that everything they want to be sure and keep (sometimes they’re only concerned about keeping very specific files) should be moved to a new folder (maybe call it Takeout) and then only select that particular folder once they begin the Takeout process.

The last step will give you some options for the type of archive file and its size. I would recommend leaving this set to a zip file with a maximum size of 2 gigabytes. Note: If your Google Drive files are over the max file size, they will automatically be separated out into multiple zip files so don’t fret if this happens. You can then choose how you want to receive your archive. I left mine set to “send download link via email”.

So, what happens once you receive the email that your archive is ready? You’ll click the link in your email and it will take you straight away to downloading your archive:

Hit the download button and you’re off and running saving your archive to your computer. Remember that once your files hit that maximum size they will automatically be chunked out into separate zip files. Once you have them saved to your computer you can do a couple different things:

  1. Leave the zip files as is and keep them saved to a computer, flash drive, or store them in Google Drive in another Google account.
  2. Unzip (extract) the files to be able to open them and edit them. Once the files are unzipped they can then easily be uploaded into Drive in another Google account (school or personal).

Either way, you’ve now successfully saved an archive of your Drive or any other G Suite apps! Enjoy your Takeout and have a great summer!

3 Ways for #EdTech Coaches to Communicate with G Suite for Education

In my previous post, I shared some thoughts about the importance of edtech coaches to be an effective and efficient communicator. Strong communication skills, coupled with building relationships, creates a very strong foundation for success in working with teachers and students.

Since many school systems use G Suite for Education already, I thought I’d keep this post under that umbrella and share a few ways you can more effectively communicate and share information with teachers and staff.

Boomerang for Gmail
This is one of my favorite Chrome extensions for Gmail. Boomerang for Gmail has many great functions like the ability to schedule your emails ahead of time (which is great for working ahead to create regularity to your communication efforts), and you can “boomerang” them for yourself to temporarily get it out of your inbox until a later date. Also, you can set it up so if the receiver does not reply to or open your email within a given time frame it will automatically get sent to them again.

 

Boomerang for Gmail adds a “Send Later” button when you compose a message.

After you install Boomerang for Gmail you will need to refresh your inbox, and then authorize Boomerang to access your Google account.

Note: I use the free version of Boomerang for Gmail. There are paid options but I’ve never felt the need to have that. Thanks to Jeff Bradbury for the reminder! 

Google Classroom
I know Google Classroom isn’t new anymore, but it doesn’t have to be used only with students. Technology coaches can create “classes” for different buildings that are focused on edtech PD, ideas, and resources for teachers to access. If we’re going to be at a particular building working with teachers on a given day, the space for those teachers in Classroom is a quick and easy way to share slides, links, or other materials they need to be an active participant in their learning. It can also be used to create discussion activities and post questions to receive professional development feedback.

A newer feature in Google Classroom that is great for organizing your communication is the ability to create topics. Any type of post you create can be tagged with a particular topic, which will make it easier for teachers to find previous resources you have posted.

Google Forms
Part of being a strong communicator as an edtech coach is making the time to understand your learners’ needs prior to meeting with them; whether that’s 1 teacher or a group of 20 teachers. Creating a Google Form is a great way to do this. Sure, you could email the group and collect replies, but who wants more emails in their inbox? Sending out a quick form as a “needs assessment” is a great way to help you feel more prepared heading into the meeting. The more you know beforehand, the better prepared you’ll be and your teachers will really appreciate the learning being tailored to their needs. Even if your topic isn’t yet decided, a form is a great way to provide teachers with a “menu” of options to seek input and give them a voice in their professional development.

Bonus! Bitmoji for Gmail
Earlier in the post when I mentioned Boomerang for Gmail, you might have noticed in my screenshot that “Bitmoji” Kyle made an appearance. 🙂 If you haven’t delved into the world that is Bitmoji you should definitely check it out. It allows you to create a fun “cartoon” style version of yourself. The Bitmoji Chrome Extension can add some fun to not only your texts but you can insert the Bitmoji version of yourself right into your emails too. If you produce a weekly or monthly edtech newsletter, you can also use the extension to insert your Bitmoji into a Google Doc or Slides presentation too.

 Disclaimer: while Bitmoji is definitely a fun way to communicate there are some that are not school appropriate.

There are certainly lots of other great tools for communication but I wanted to share a few of my favorites that fall under the Google umbrella. What are your favorite communication tools?