Tag Archives: education

Start Somewhere

I am attending FETC in Orlando this week. If you have never been I’d encourage you to give it a go if your school/district can send you. Bring a team if you can. Get your district leadership to attend. There’s lots of great learning and many great people to connect with. However, this post isn’t just about why you should attend a conference.

From now all the way through summer is when the in-person conference opportunities really ramp up. We’re hearing more and more about personalizing learning, creating innovative learning opportunities, devices, coding, 3d printing, makerspaces, and the list can certainly go on and on. Many of you will be at these events. My question is, however, “Are the right people attending?”.

When anyone attends an event like FETC, ISTE, etc., there’s going to be an over-abundance of information coming at you. What’s important to do though, even before sitting through one session, is to identify one particular area that you want to begin with to change teaching and learning in your classroom or school. If you intake all this information (don’t get me wrong these events give you lots of great information) without a plan of what you’re going to do after the event is over, you’re not only doing yourself a disservice, but you’re doing kids a disservice too. Create your plan of where to start before the learning even begins.

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Yes, You’re a Leader

“I have nothing good to share.”

“No one wants to hear from little ol’ me.”

“I don’t have anything to offer that hasn’t been shared a million times.”

“What I did isn’t a big deal.”

These are just a few of the statements I’ve heard from teachers over the last many years as I’ve worked with them to build their capacity around technology and innovation in teaching and learning. Whether it’s a teacher that has jumped in feet first into project based learning or a teacher that learns new ways for students to publish their work to the world, I hear statements like those above when I encourage them to share what they’ve done.

To those of you in a similar role like mine, one that delivers professional learning and support to educators; encouragement, and cheerleading is an essential component of our profession. There is no victory too small to celebrate. We now have such a variety of ways to share the great things we’re learning and trying with students that we can no longer afford to not do it. While Twitter and blogging is certainly an option, there are also more localized ways to start. It might just be sending an email to your immediate team or department, or to the staff at your school, or in 5 minutes at a faculty meeting. Share in ways that feel comfortable to you, then once your comfort increases take it up a notch from there.

These are big but necessary steps in your growth as a teacher. Here’s an example from a teacher in my district: Mrs. Romero, who jumped back into blogging after some time away from it to reflect on 1st semester of going gradeless and trying more innovative things in her classroom.

You have the ability and the power to be a leader in your school and in your district. Don’t doubt it! Once you make that step I promise it will not only be rewarding for your colleagues, but for you too.

3 Steps to Creating Empowered Leadership in Your School

This post was also a guest post for McGraw-Hill Education.

All too often in education – whether that be at a conference, in a professional learning workshop, or even at a faculty meeting, we have become used to one person in the room being the “expert”, or the “Oz” around a particular topic. While these leaders are certainly needed to help us shift our thinking and culture around teaching and learning, they should not stay the only authority on a topic for long. As educational
leaders; superintendents, assistant superintendents, directors, principals, and assistant principals – are we investing the time to build leadership capacity in others? It is my belief that the best leaders create more leaders. We should all strive to be a 
“multiplier”, someone who wishes to increase leadership capacity in others.

So, how do we do this? I would like to offer a few suggestions.

  1. Help others realize their influence potential.

In my experience as a leader in the world of educational technology, I have watched many teachers over and over again not give themselves enough credit in terms of their ability to influence their colleagues. This usually starts with a fair amount of fear followed by self-doubt of their ability to offer anything substantial to their fellow teachers. We have to diligently keep encouraging educators to try moving forward with one thing at a time. More often than not, teachers attend some type of professional learning event and come back to their classroom not knowing where to begin; feeling overwhelmed and therefore not doing anything. This is the worse possible post-event outcome I can think of. Pick one thing, get really good at it and boom! You’re now in a position to influence others; whether that be in a face to face setting, writing a blog post about it, or just sending out an email to colleagues for some healthy “Hey check out this awesome thing I tried!”.  In being a connected educator for just over 8 years now, this is such a rewarding thing to witness for me personally, to see other teachers have success, and be excited to share it with others.

2. Create opportunities for others to spread their genius.

Are you making time for others to share their stories? During that next professional learning workshop, faculty meeting, or even in that next electronic newsletter, is time being devoted/given for your own people to share the great things they’re doing? If no, then why not? As someone who leads presents conference sessions and workshops quite often, one of my upfront disclaimers is always something to the effect of, “By all means, please not only stop me with questions, but please also stop me to share your own story about how (insert topic here) has changed teaching and learning for the better in your classroom.”. Make a commitment to give a teacher 5-10 minutes of your next staff meeting to share something awesome they did. You’re not only creating the opportunity here for a teacher to spread their genius, you’re creating a tremendous sense of empowered leadership in them too!

Have you looked at digital options for people to share? What about creating a professional learning blog for your school or district and having a guest author each month? Just like our students, some teachers feel way more comfortable expressing themselves electronically than they would if you ask them to speak face to face to their peers. Create a district hashtag for sharing professional learning (our district’s is #GVEaglePD) and get teaches sharing their learning out loud on Twitter. It not only gives a voice for others to share the great things they’re doing, but it also creates an online learning community within your school or district that can be a source of learning for others.

3. Commit to a plan of sustainability

The bottom line here, is that this can’t be a “flash in the pan” thing. None of what I’m sharing with you in this blog post is meant to be a “one and done” event. It must be ongoing, and become the norm; an everyday component of how we grow as educators to be the best we can be for our students. We’re at the verge of 2017 and we still are talking about “21st-century skills” or creating “21st-century teaching and learning environments”. How about it all just becomes “teaching and learning”? Don’t we owe it to our teachers and our students to see the importance of learning from each other on a regular basis?

Have you ever thought about creating edcamp style professional learning opportunities for teachers? The chances are really high that at least one person in your school or district has been to an edcamp before. Creating your own edcamp learning event is a prime way to get people sharing the great things they’re doing. I promise you that after you do this once, teachers will be wanting it again and again so just plan on doing this at least a couple times a year. I have seen this offered in the summer before the start of a new school year, and also as part of a district professional learning day when students are not at school. It’s awesome!

We have so many teachers doing great things in our schools. That knowledge and expertise can’t remain contained within the 4 walls of their classrooms. To keep it that way is a professional disservice to our colleagues and a learning disservice to our students. It’s not about finding the time, it’s about making the time.

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