Tag Archives: edtech

Parents as #Edtech Partners

A partnership with parents is critical to all success in our schools and classrooms; technology or not. There’s always a barrage of initiatives and events; academic, extracurricular, athletic, or otherwise. Looking specifically through the lens of technology, however, we must pay careful attention to the partnerships we’re hopefully already forming with our parents. With all the 1:1 implementations, STEM, apps, devices, etc. we’re giving kids access to, we must constantly be assessing where parents are at in terms of a foundational understanding of what this means for their child(ren).

I have said many times in talks and workshops I’ve given that I believe

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parents are the most underserved group in education. Is it solely a school district’s job to educate parents about technology, social media, digital citizenship, etc.? Of course not. As a parent myself, I still need to first and foremost be a diligent parent and make time to check my daughter’s phone, ask lots of question, and embarrass her in public as often as possible. ūüôā However, the more access to the world and devices we provide students to have that access, we must create not only learning opportunities for staff, but for the parents as well.

So, what are some ways we can do this? I have seen some very successful parent learning nights around technology, STEM, and digital citizenship. Guess what? The best ones weren’t led by teachers, they were led by kids! Yes, elementary students too. Put the planning in students’ hands. Ask them to come up with the agenda of what their parents need to know about Chromebooks, iPads, G Suite, Chrome, this app, that app, etc. Have the students share about what good online collaboration looks like, what it means to be a good digital citizen, and show examples of the amazing things technology allows them to create and learn about.

This is all called being proactive instead of reactive about #edtech. Create learning opportunities for parents before something negative happens. It makes those difficult conversations (about negative topics) a bit easier and students have more ownership of technology’s place in teaching and learning.

3 Ways for #EdTech Coaches to Communicate with G Suite for Education

In my previous post, I shared some thoughts about the importance of edtech coaches to be an effective and efficient communicator. Strong communication skills, coupled with building relationships, creates a very strong foundation for success in working with teachers and students.

Since many school systems use G Suite for Education¬†already, I thought I’d keep this post under that umbrella and share a few ways you can more effectively communicate and share information with teachers and staff.

Boomerang for Gmail
This is one of my favorite Chrome extensions for Gmail. Boomerang for Gmail has many great functions like the ability to schedule your emails ahead of time (which is great for working ahead to create regularity to your communication efforts), and you can “boomerang” them for yourself to temporarily get it out of your inbox until a later date. Also, you can set it up so if the receiver does not reply to or open your email within a given time frame it will automatically get sent to them again.

 

Boomerang for Gmail adds a “Send Later” button when you compose a message.

After you install Boomerang for Gmail you will need to refresh your inbox, and then authorize Boomerang to access your Google account.

Note: I use the free version of Boomerang for Gmail. There are paid options but I’ve never felt the need to have that. Thanks to Jeff Bradbury for the reminder!¬†

Google Classroom
I know Google Classroom isn’t new anymore, but it doesn’t have to be used only with students. Technology coaches can create “classes” for different buildings that are focused on edtech¬†PD, ideas, and resources for teachers to access. If we’re going to be at a particular building working with teachers on a given day, the space for those teachers in Classroom is a quick and easy way to share slides, links, or other materials they need to be an active participant in their learning. It can also be used to create discussion activities and post questions to receive professional development feedback.

A newer feature in Google Classroom that is great for organizing your communication is the ability to create topics. Any type of post you create can be tagged with a particular topic, which will make it easier for teachers to find previous resources you have posted.

Google Forms
Part of being a strong communicator as an edtech coach is making the time to understand your learners’ needs prior to meeting with them; whether that’s 1 teacher or a group of 20 teachers. Creating a Google Form is a great way to do this. Sure, you could email the group and collect replies, but who wants more emails in their inbox? Sending out a quick form as a “needs assessment” is a great way to help you feel more prepared heading into the meeting. The more you know beforehand, the better prepared you’ll be and your teachers will really appreciate the learning being tailored to their needs. Even if your topic isn’t yet decided, a form is a great way to provide teachers with a “menu” of options to seek input and give them a voice in their professional development.

Bonus! Bitmoji for Gmail
Earlier in the post when I mentioned Boomerang for Gmail, you might have noticed in my screenshot that “Bitmoji” Kyle made an appearance. ūüôā If you haven’t delved into the world that is Bitmoji you should definitely check it out. It allows you to create a fun “cartoon” style version of yourself. The Bitmoji Chrome Extension¬†can add some fun to not only your texts but you can insert the Bitmoji version of yourself right into your emails too. If you produce a weekly or monthly edtech newsletter, you can also use the extension to insert your Bitmoji into a Google Doc or Slides presentation too.

 Disclaimer: while Bitmoji is definitely a fun way to communicate there are some that are not school appropriate.

There are certainly lots of other great tools for communication but I wanted to share a few of my favorites that fall under the Google umbrella. What are your favorite communication tools?

 

 

Help Me Help You

If you’re an instructional technology coach, instructional technology specialist, educational technologist, or whatever edtech coaching title you may have, a crucial skill in the work of supporting teachers is being a good communicator. It’s essential. It must be a regular, well thought, purposeful component of the job.

a few megaphones over a blue sky

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A quick email or Google Form can give you just the right information you need ahead of working with teachers, administrators, or support staff. The more you know ahead of time not only helps you be better prepared, but also helps you make the learning more relevant for your audience. It doesn’t matter if it’s one teacher or a big group; invest the time to reach out, learn their needs, and be prepared to meet those needs to the best of your ability. This includes providing necessary information to help your audience be best prepared to learn.

For those of you that are receiving the communication mentioned above, please take the time to help us better help you. We want you to feel like your time with us was worth it. It’s important you have successful learning experiences because that means giving our students better learning experiences.

I hope to expand on some communication tips and tricks in future posts!