Giving Students The World

Over the last few weeks in my district we have had The Google Expeditions Pioneer Program visit one of our middle schools and one of our elementary schools. I appreciate having one of our teachers and one of our library media specialists and their administrators invest the time to bring this experience to students. It’s still a really new program that Google is taking to various locations around the country to test it, as well as raise awareness about it. If you’re wondering, when they visit your school they bring everything necessary to give your students the Google Expeditions experience: about 30-60 Google Cardboard viewers, Android phones (and chargers), Nexus 9 tablets, and they even bring their wireless network. The entire experience is guided by the teacher using the Nexus 9 tablet. The teacher takes students on a virtual field trip with about 140 locations worldwide to choose from. The teachers push the expedition to the Cardboard viewers and guide students to various points at each location. The teacher can even see where students are looking from the tablet app. It’s definitely something you have to experience first hand to fully understand how it works.

During the day yesterday I noticed that my friend Devin from Council Bluffs was also watching students have the exact same experience at the exact same time. We both were tweeting/instagramming (is this a word now?) pictures throughout the day. Devin wrote a reflection post called Oooh and Ahhh Moments.  Devin and I were on the same wavelength with our respective posts I think.

Watching students have a learning experience like this should be cause for reflection. Their excitement and engagement for learning in this particular instance was infectious to be around. We can all remember (hopefully) a learning or teaching experience like this. Yet, we still are so ingrained with learning being all too static of an experience. Am I saying that we all run out and buy this set up (you can’t yet by the way) and make everything into a Google Expedition? Of course not. My point is, that with all the access and devices we’re providing students, are we truly stopping and reflecting deeply about teaching and learning? All the access and all the devices in the world aren’t going to change a thing. It will be our leaders and teachers that make the time for thoughtful reflection and conversation about what’s best for kids that will. Then it’ll be those same leaders and teachers that are willing to make big changes necessary to truly move us forward.  Learning is not confined to a physical space or a given time frame any longer. The world is out there, and our students can be taken to it in an instant.

Here’s a short recap of some of our 2nd thru 6th graders’ day with Google Expeditions. Enjoy.

1 thought on “Giving Students The World”

  1. This is so cool ! As a current student in BEd., I am so excited to integrate this type of learning engagement through technology in the classroom. In the video, the kids were so excited and some seemed a little uneasy. In the video, one girl stated she was scared and another student sat down, perhaps because the visual stimulation did not match his physical stance of standing and perhaps he felt dizzy. I did read Devin’s blog and his similar experience and he mentioned that the Google rep mentioned a safety blurb before the experience. Now knowing that some students may feel scared, dizzy or other negative side effects, do you think that you would use this technology in the classroom still on a consistent basis? Or would you use it more sporadically?

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